Porch House // What the Powder Bathroom Cost + Budget Tips

THE PORCH HOUSE  

The powder bathroom budget is part 5 of our Porch House powder bath series. You can read more here: designwhy we added a powder bathroom8 great wallpapers, and the reveal

Last week I showed you one of my all-time favorite renovations, the powder bathroom at the Porch House. This little space is a beautiful jewel box within this simple home, which was built in 1900, long before powder bathrooms were popular. It’s the finishes that set this room apart: bold wallpaper, brass accents, and board and batten painted in the warmest neutral. And I think it’s all just so pretty, but can you believe it was also done on a small budget?

The Grit and Polish - Porch Powder Bathroom sink 3 CLEAN

The finishes for this new bathroom rang in at just over $1200.  Here’s where the dollars went:

Powder Bathroom Finishes Budget

$480 wallpaper (2 rolls)

$100 board and batten materials

$50 paint

$225 pedestal sink

$64 faucet (from ebay)

$50 brass sconce

$150 toilet

$100 plumbing, caulk, misc

$0 framing/drywall/flooring (not included, see below)*

$1219 TOTAL

*framing, drywall, and flooring costs are not included in this budget since those costs are almost impossible to pull out of the whole-house renovation we completed at the same time as this bathroom. If you had to throw a dart at those materials costs, they’d be in the realm of $300-$500. Again, that’s materials only.

It’s also important to note that this bathroom is brand new to the house. We carved the space out of an existing bedroom. The powder bathroom is about 34sf. You can see the floor plan here.

Budgeting is an art form that not everyone possess and it’s so easy to spend a small fortune on renovating. So today I wanted to include a few insights and tips on how we kept the powder bathroom budget so low. These tips are relevant to any renovation and could help maximize your dollars on your next project.

Tips on How we got a High-End Look on a Budget

One // Splurge on one High Impact Item, Save on the Rest. In this room we splurged on the wallpaper, which is the single most defining design feature. The wallpaper range in at $480, which is over 1/3 of our overall materials budget for this space. But that was our only splurge.

Two // Inexpensive Wall Treatments that Look Expensive. We designed and built the board and batten wainscot in this room for $100. It’s constructed entirely of mdf trim, a little caulk, and some paint. And the finished product looks way more expensive than it actually cost.

Three // Plan Ahead! Planning ahead can save you a ton of money in shipping fees, rush order, sale prices, and it turns out extra rolls of wallpaper too. Before we got to work on the board and batten, we ran the numbers on the wallpaper’s pattern repeat, width, and length and figured out that if we brought the wainscot up to 5′ we’d only need two rolls of the expensive wallpaper. In the end there was hardly two feet of wallpaper to spare, but planning ahead saved us from spending another $240 in wallpaper.

Four // Search for second-hand, Refurbished, or Out-of-Box Items. We found the brass faucet, an out-of-box item, on Ebay. It rang in at a good half of what it would sell for new. And while we weren’t able to reuse an existing toilet or repurpose an old sink in this bathroom, we almost always do.

Five // Keep the Design Simple. This tip is pretty intuitive: having less things in your space means spending less money. Simple, minimal spaces simply cost less to build. We stuck with just the necessities in here and that went for paint colors too.  We used the same color on the trim and ceiling in here as we did through the main floor of the Porch House – C2 Vex and BM Simply White – so we didn’t need to buy extra paint. And bonus, the simple color palette helps the house flow from one room to the next, giving it that pulled-together feel.

Six // Inexpensive Art.  The single art print in this bathroom was a free download from one of my favorite blogs, the Faux Martha. I printed it at Costco and framed it in a Target frame for a total cost of under $15. Talk about budget! You can check out more inexpensive art ideas here.

Seven // Do the Work Yourself! You knew this one was coming. We’re big advocates of doing work ourselves because it saves money, teaches valuable skills, and controls the end product. Plus it can be hard to recoup your investment when you hire out entire projects, at least in a small-town real estate market like Ellensburg (Seattle is a whooole different ball game). And that may not be a huge deal for someone who plans to stay in the home forever and just really wants a pretty powder bathroom, but it is a huge deal for Garrett and I who tackled this renovation as an investment. I’m guessing if you asked a contractor to build this bathroom, you’d be looking at upwards of $10k in materials, design, and labor (plumber, electrician, general labor, wallpaper-er, etc), so doing all that ourselves saved a ton of money.

The Grit and Polish - Porch Powder Bathroom GW print 2

Porch House Powder Bathroom Sources:

You can find all the resources for this bathroom here.

Related posts:

Powder bath design // Why we added a powder bathroom // 8 great powder bathroom wallpapers // the Porch House powder bathroom reveal // Porch House floor plan // Porch House master suite // Ideas for Inexpensive art // A 36sf master bathroom // A 36sf master bathroom budget

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8 Great Wallpapers for a Powder Bathroom

This is part 2 of our powder bath series. You can read more here: designwhy we added a powder bathroom.

One of my favorite parts about designing the Porch House powder bathroom was that it was dark and small. I know, I know! Those are not exactly the words that come to mind when you’re thinking about favorite architectural features, but here’s the thing. Small rooms can handle bolder patterns. They excel with darker, cozier colors. And small bathrooms are the perfect place for experimentation in design because it’s not a room that you’re looking at all day long (unless you’re potty training a toddler ;).

The Grit and Polish - Porch Powder Bathroom from doorway

Our Porch House renovation, powder bathroom

At the Porch House, I selected this wallpaper from Farrow and Ball as the main focal point of the design. I went with navy because it was one of the three colors I used in that house – yes, just 3 colors for 2000sf – and the pattern felt traditional yet interesting. The traditional bit was key because the house was earmarked for resell so we wanted to make sure our finishes had wide appeal.

While I love (LOVE!) the wallpaper we used, if this had been a bathroom at our Farmhouse I would have probably looked at more options. Shopping for ourselves instead of some unknown buyer would have meant we could look at whimsical, busy, and quirky prints. But even with more options available, I have to admit that it’s really hard for me to commit to wallpaper. It’s expensive and difficult to install, plus my tastes change. But when I do commit to a wallpaper, it’s always super interesting to look at.  And that leads me to my number one tip for wallpaper selection:

Tip: when picking out wallpaper, make sure you love to stare at the pattern. Tape a sample next to your computer or above your kitchen sink. If you find yourself getting lost in the print, staring at it for unknown lengths of time, than it’s a good option for your home. Loving a wallpaper pattern is good too, but love fades and taste changes. Whether or not you find a pattern interesting has more staying power. Plus, if the wallpaper isn’t interesting to look at, just save yourself a whole bunch of time and money and paint the room.

With that sentiment in mind, I’ve rounded up eight great wallpaper patterns that could live large in the small confines of a powder bathroom.

The Grit and Polish - 8 Wallpapers for a small bathroom

Top // 1 / 2 / 3/ 4 / green paint / navy paint

Bottom // 1 (room via My Scandinavian Home) / 2 / 3 (room designed by Jersey Ice Cream Co at Magic Egg Farmhouse) / 4 / neutral paint / white paint

For the record, I haven’t ordered from all of these companies, so don’t have any feedback on that. But I love that some of these prints are reproductions from folks like William Morris. And one note about coordinating paint colors: white is always a great option, but I paired a warm neutral trim color with our navy wallpaper at the Porch House and it looks so much better than white ever could have. So don’t be afraid to step away from white (ahem, Cathy!) and try something new once in a while.

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Porch House Master Suite // Introductions (ORC Week 1)

THE PORCH HOUSE

This post is part of a 6-week series for the One Room Challenge, a blogger makeover challenge hosted by Calling it Home every Fall and Spring. We’re tackling the Porch House’s master bathroom and closet this go around.  Thanks for following along!

Without a doubt, the biggest renovation that Garrett and I have taken on to date is the Porch House.  Not only did we renovate a big chunk of the house in 16 days for our HGTV pilot (which should air soon!), but we’ve been tackling the rest of the house ever since.  Every square inch of this house needs work, but one of my favorite projects has been reconfiguring the main floor to accommodate a master suite.  Master suites were a rare commodity in 1900, when the Porch House was built, and adding this feature should make the house a whole lot more relevant in 2017, not to mention help with resale.

Since some of you may be new to the Grit and Polish, let me do a quick introduction.  My husband, Garrett, and I renovate old houses in Washington state, but our start on this path was less than auspicious.  Like many young couples, we bought our first old house with the intent to fix it up and live in it forever. But the recession made quick work of those plans and through a series of unpredictable events, we turned into landlords (you can read more about that here).  Thankfully, we liked being landlords, and as rental income began filling our savings account, we saw a new path forward for ourselves.  Over the next few years, we purchased and renovated 3 more homes, and eventually turned them into rental properties (the Bryant, Ravenna, and Dexter houses) all while working full-time jobs and having babies.  In 2016, it was time to slow down, so we quit our jobs, moved to a Farmhouse in the country, and became full-time parents, landlords, and renovators.  This year, we also picked up our first flip project, filmed a pilot for HGTV, and had our third child, a baby girl named Daphne.  Apparently we’re not that great at slowing down 😉

Okay, back to the One Room Challenge.  Last year I joined in the Fall One Room Challenge as a guest participant for the first time and made over our Farmhouse master bedroom, shown below.  It was a really fun experience as a blogger, and I’ve been eager to join in ever since.

the-grit-and-polish-master-bedroom-open-windows-2

I’m excited that this go around, I get to do a bigger renovation project.  See when we bought the Porch House, it needed a lot of work, and the future master bathroom and closet were no exception.  The space was dark and dull and totally uninspired.  Take a look for yourself:

The Grit and Polish - Porch Bedroom Coversion 2The Grit and Polish - Porch Before Bathroom 2The Grit and Polish - Porch Before BathroomThe Grit and Polish - Porch Before Bedroom to Bathroom 1The Grit and Polish - Porch Before Bedroom to Bathroom 3

That last photo is of the second main-floor bedroom, which we’ll also be working on during the One Room Challenge.  We are planning to convert both the existing bathroom and this second bedroom into the master bathroom and closet plus a powder bathroom.  That may be a bit confusing, so here is what it looks like in plan view.  This is the original layout:

708 E Tacoma_Floor plan3

And here’s what we’re planning:

708 E Tacoma_Floor plan3

Thankfully we are a little ahead of the curve and have already finished demo, framing, drywall, and rough-in plumbing.  So we are ready to hit the ground running with this 6-week makeover!

The Grit and Polish - Porch Master Bath Progress Framing 1

That little bit of navy blue wall you see is the master bedroom, which is a darker and moodier bedroom than I’ve ever done before.  That space was made over as part of our HGTV pilot, so you can catch the reveal when the show airs (slated to be this Fall!).

The Grit and Polish - Porch Master Bath Progress Drywall 1The Grit and Polish - Porch Master Bath Progress Framing 2

So let’s talk about my design plans for this master bathroom and closet.  I’m envisioning a bright, classic space that feels at home in an old house, but yet also fresh and relevant.  There will be lots of white, per my usual, plus chrome, wood, marble, and a bit of slate.  Here is the inspiration I’m drawing from.

The Grit and Polish - Porch House Master Suite Inspiration

Inspiration, clockwise from top left: 1 // 2 // 3

The top, left inspiration photo is from a design duo out of Portland called Kaemingk Design.  They create amazing bathrooms (and all spaces, really), and we’ll be using similar tiles in our shower and a long cloth curtain in lieu of a glass enclosure.  I’m planning on laying a slate tile floor in the bathroom just as Studio McGee did in the mudroom image.  And lastly, we’re planning on a custom wood vanity in a similar style to the one shown.

Next week I’ll catch you up on paint and hopefully recap the hardwood floor refinish (we laid hardwoods in the closet).  The refinish is going down right now, so you can catch a peek on my stories. I can’t wait to share our progress with you!

ORC guest

Be sure to check out all the featured designers and the guests designers here!

xoxo

-Cathy

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The Second Bathroom: An (Almost) After

THE RAVENNA HOUSE

Well we still haven’t quite finished the basement bathroom.  But it’s about 99% there, so I’m throwing in the towel.  Some day we’ll get hooks up and hang a mirror.  Maybe even add a little art.  But until then, I’m calling it done enough.

The Grit and Polish - Basement Bathroom Remodel

We originally envisioned this space as more of a utility bathroom with a large, deep sink and taller faucet.  A place to bathe a baby or throw your shoes after a rainy run.  But a series of events – mainly the budget and our intense desire to wrap this project up – left us with the materials at hand.  The mahogany door is original to the house (although refinished) and the vanity was a $100 Craigslist find that we painted and put a new top on.

Unfortunately this room gets like zero natural daylight, so the photos have an eerie glow.  But ignore that.  In person, it’s a warm and comfortable space.

The Grit and Polish - Basement Bathroom VanityThe Grit and Polish - Basement Bathroom Remodel 2

This space has heated floors, which is amazing.  But even without these, this room would be pretty popular.  Garrett and I both shower down here despite the fact that our room is upstairs next to the main bathroom.

The Grit and Polish - Basement Shower Renovation.jpg

The faux-wood tiles run seamlessly between the bathroom and laundry room.  I had Garrett lay these in a herringbone pattern, to tie in with the kitchen backsplash.  I’m pretty into these tiles – they are inexpensive and look great.

The Grit and Polish - Bathroom and Mudroom Herringbone Floors

It’s amazing how much work we’ve put into this little space.  When we bought the The Ravenna House, there was no bathroom in the basement.  There was actually nothing in the basement besides a sketchy black-painted room and an old non-functional furnace.  Here’s a pic after we finished demo but before we finished framing.  To orient you, the new window on the back wall is the window in the bathroom over the toilet.

Ravenna House Basement Bathroom Photo 1 1-31-14

After we finished framing, we plumbed and sheet-rocked and tiled and painted.  We even had to pour a partial slab back where we had to dig up the ground to install the new drain line.

photo-1-25281-2529blogger-image-17315300IMG_8229Basement BathroomBathroom shower tile 2 Masking for Basement Paint 3

And because I like to leave things on a good note, here’s one more pic of the done-deal:

The Grit and Polish - Basement Bathroom Remodel 1

Vanity: Craigslist | Marble Countertop and Sink: GS Cabinet | Door and Hardware: Original to house | Floor Tiles: Home Depot | Shower Floor Tiles: Home Depot | Shower Wall Tiles: Home Depot | Wall Paint: Sherwin Williams White Duck | Trim Paint: BM Simply White | Mirror: 10+ years old, from Michaels | Sconces: Amazon

More on the bathroom inspiration here, renovation here and tiling the shower here.

What do you guys think?  Anything you’d do differently?

xoxo

p.s. This apartment is ah-mazing!  Although I disagree with the author – 1000sf isn’t that small.

p.p.s. Two of my favorite people chat: Martha Stewart and Kai Ryssdal (of Marketplace).

p.p.p.s. I say yes to Greece.  Yes, yes yes!

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